Utility Rebate Programs Recognize HI Pump Rating System

Utility Rebate Programs Recognize HI Pump Rating System

In our last blog we introduced the new HI Energy Rating System for clean water pumps. The HI Rating System not only helps engineers pick a more efficient pump, it also makes it easy for utilities to develop incentives that rewards owners for using HI Rated equipment.  Several US utilities are already onboard…  

Read More

Part Load Efficiency Values (PLEV) Part 2: How to use PLEV for Pump Selection

Part Load Efficiency Values (PLEV) Part 2: How to use PLEV for Pump Selection

In our last blog post, we introduced the PLEV, or Part Load Efficiency Value from Bell and Gossett. This week we look at some selections and how to use PLEV.

PLEV was created to give a weighted average of the pump efficiency for the HVAC and plumbing industry. This new efficiency average gives the engineer or designer an efficiency that is most likely a better representation of the actual...

Read More

Understanding Primary Secondary Pumping Part 6: 5 Ways to Pump an HVAC System

By Chris Edmondson

There’s more than one way to pump a chiller or boiler system.  In fact, there are five common approaches, and all but one includes some variation of our topic of late -- primary secondary pumping. 

Variable Primary Pumping

Contemporary systems that do not utilize primary secondary pumping are typically known as variable primary systems.  In this simple design, there is only one set of pumps (chiller or boiler pumps) creating flow for the entire system. 

Read More

How to Read a Pump Curve - Part 3

 Pump selection can have dramatic impact on the overall operating cost of a hydronic system.  Consulting several pumps curves prior to the selection of a pump is the key to minimizing these operating costs.   In this blog we will discuss the factors that impact pump efficiency and how pump curves can be used to take the guesswork out of efficienct pump selection. 
Read More

How To Read A Pump Curve - Part 2

One of the most important lines on a pump performance curve is the Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) curve.  Discreetly applied either below or above the pump performance and efficiency curves, this single plotted line is the key to avoiding cavitation. Required NPSH or NPSHR for a given pump increases with flow.  So, using the pump curve shown in Figure 1, we can see that the NPSHR for this Model 1510 B & G pump with a 8” impeller and 800 GPM and 33 Feet of Total Head is 12 feet of head. 
Read More